Film Preview: Mr. Holmes (2015)

Poster


Trailer Link

Release Date:

July 17, 2015

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “An aged, retired Sherlock Holmes looks back on his life, and grapples with an unsolved case involving a beautiful woman.”

Poster: B-

Review: A simple, yet elegant design that evokes a Victorian era, a character’s personality and a wide array of emotional responses to a character with whom millions are familiar.

Trailer: C+

Review: I don’t expect a small, simple film to engender ravished excitement, but the trailer hints at a mystery unfolding within the film, but without a hint of passion.

Oscar Prospects:

Bill Condon hasn’t had a lot of success in recent years, but this film looks like it could be a return to form for the fimmaker. If the film is of the level of equality of his pat films, it could be a stealth contender for a number of awards, including Best Actor for Ian McKellen.

Revisions:

(April 19, 2015) Original

Oscar in Box Office History (Week 17, 2015)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals in the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office that weekend historically. All data is collected from Box Office Mojo. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best chance at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

None

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The NEW Friday Face-Off #90

We started over at the beginning of August 2013, but with a new, more streamlined methodology to collecting votes. Just choose one selection in each of the ten categories (or fewer depending on the week) below. Our first few weeks were to select winners in cases of ties or in years where multiple categories existed for each discipline. After that, we started going into the full face-off contest where each winner will then move on to a second round to face off against others.

Here is this week’s ten (or fewer) face-offs. So, let’s get started.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 24 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born


Died

Released


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Poll: Best Film Editing (1979 – 1983)

Return Links

Polls

Best Film Editing Poll: 1979 – 1983

<a href="http://www.sodahead.com/entertainment/cinema-sight-asks-which-best-film-editing-winner-is-best/question-4795666/" title="Cinema Sight Asks: Which Best Film Editing winner is best?">Cinema Sight Asks: Which Best Film Editing winner is best?</a>

Film Preview: Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)

Poster


Trailer Link

Release Date:

March 16, 2016

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “No description currently available”

Poster:

Review: There was no poster immediately available for my review. Should one become available in the future, this section will be updated.

Trailer: B-

Review: After the release of the new Star Wars trailer and the unfavorable comparisons between it and this, I wanted to like this more. Being a teaser for a film so far out, it seems quite polished. Unfortunately, it’s not the level of polished fans of either Batman or Superman really want. Perhaps their next attempt will be a bit more fascinating.

Oscar Prospects:

It will be an effects extravaganza, which could benefit it greatly at the Oscars for 2016, but it all depends on the competition, which isn’t going to be as fierce as this year’s.

Revisions:

(April 19, 2015) Original

Oscar Profile #233: Rumer Godden

GoddenBorn (Margaret) Rumer Godden in Sussex, England on December 10, 1907, the future novelist grew up with her three sisters in a section of colonial India that is now part of Bangladesh where her father was a shipping company executive. Sent to England for schooling, she and her sisters were brought back to India at the outset of the First World War. She returned to England to continue her interrupted schooling in 1920, eventually training as a dance teacher. She went back to India in 1925 and opened a dance school for English and Indian children and young women in Calcutta. Godden ran the school for 20 years with the help of her sister Nancy. A writer from the age of 5, she wrote a fanciful autobiography at 8, but did not become a published writer until the age of 29. Her third novel, Black Narcissus, published in 1939, was an immediate international success that has never been out of print since. She would publish more than 60 books over the course of her long life.

Godden ran afoul of both the English and the Indians when she admitted young half-caste or Eurasian women in her dance school as both cultures considered this tantamount to running a brothel. She married sportsman Laurence Foster in 1934 when she became pregnant, although she later claimed she never really loved him. She lost the baby four days after he was born and later had two daughters with Foster who left the family to join the army at the outbreak of World War II. After he’d gone she discovered that he had drained their joint bank account and left her with a large debt due to bad stock investments. He returned briefly while on leave and after he’d gone went on a long trek where she became desperately ill. She had a miscarriage without even realizing she had been pregnant. When she discovered he was having an affair with another officer’s wife, she asked him for a divorce which he agreed to only if she absolved him of any monetary responsibility toward her and her daughters.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 23 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born


Died

Released


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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Apr. 24-26, 2015)

Return Links

Polls

What Are You Watching? (Apr. 24-26, 2015)

<a href="http://www.sodahead.com/entertainment/cinema-sight-asks-what-are-you-watching-apr-24-26-2015/question-4794404/" title="Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 24-26, 2015)">Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 24-26, 2015)</a>

Trailer Watch: Terminator: Genisys, updated (2015)

New Trailer (#2) / New Poster (#2)

Terminator: Genisys, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for link to the trailer, more posters (if available) and other commentary not featured here.

Looking at the Weekend: Apr. 24-26, 2015

Furious 7 is likely to finally fall from the top position against the time-twisting romance Age of Adaline.

Individual Commentaries

Wesley Lovell: Age of Adaline has promise, but the inexperienced director behind it doesn’t give one hope.
Peter J. Patrick: This week’s new releases seem to offer something new. We shall see.
Tripp Burton: Oh man, does this week look dreary!
Thomas LaTourrette: Both The Age of Adaline and Adult Beginners sound like enjoyable if not very deep films and could be worth seeing. The other two sound a bit manipulative for my tastes.

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2015 Blockbuster Season Preview: May

The end of the year brings the most combative environment for films trying to become Oscar winners. The next four months will be an interesting proving round.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 22 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died


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Trailer Watch: Ant-Man, updated (2015)

New Trailer (#2)

Ant-Man, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for link to the trailer, more posters (if available) and other commentary not featured here.

The DVD Report #409

Another week, and another 2014 Oscar hopeful that ended up empty-handed has made it home to Blu-ray and DVD.

Tim Burton’s Big Eyes, a biographical drama about artist Margaret Keane (born 1927) and her husband, Walter, was expected to be one of the major year-end releases and a serious Oscar contender for Best Actress for five-time nominee Amy Adams. Alas, the only major awards recognition it got was a Golden Globe nomination for Best Song (“Big Eyes”) and a win for Adams as Best Actress – Musical or Comedy.

The main problem is that the film is not a comedy. It’s very nearly a tragedy with a few comic moments thrown in to relieve the unrelenting horror of the poor woman’s life. An artist since childhood, she, or rather her husband, became famous when he presented her sad, big-eyed portraits of children as his own. In order to sustain the illusion that he, and not she, is the painter, she must paint behind locked doors and lie to everyone including her daughter from her first marriage that she no longer paints herself. Finally when he almost burns down their Woodside, California home, she and her daughter escape to Hawaii where she finally finds the gumption to reveal the truth and sue him for slander.

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