This Day in Oscar History: June 22 (2017)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Jun. 23-25, 2017)

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What Are You Watching? (Jun. 23-25, 2017)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Jun. 23-25, 2017)

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Film Preview: Flatliners (2017)

Page Revisions:

(June 18, 2017) Original

Release Date:

September 29, 2017

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Medical students experiment on “near death” experiences that involve past tragedies until the dark consequences begin to jeopardize their lives.”

Poster Rating: B

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Review: A rather cheesy tagline accompanying a colorful, symbolic poster design. It’s not great, but it’s at least noticeable.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: Having seen the original in the theater 27 years ago, I can’t say that this new trailer gives me much interest in the remake. There are some interesting elements in the trailer, but it’s hopelessly generic overall.

Oscar Prospects:

Surprising as it was, the original Flatliners earned a Best Sound Effects Editing nomination. The sequel will have a much bigger hill to climb and a nomination is incredibly unlikely.

Trailer #1

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2017 Summer Season Preview: July

Here we look at the upcoming month’s offerings.

July 7, 2017

Spider-Man: Homecoming

Premise: From IMDb: “A young Peter Parker/Spider-Man begins to navigate his newfound identity as the web-slinging superhero.”
Box Office Prospects: $350 M
Expectations: Excellent. The Original made more than $400 million at the box office. The reboot made a mere $262 million. While the disparity is large, the likelihood of an inbetween result is high. Reboot fatigue may play a part, but with Iron Man in the mix, all bets are off. No film featuring Robert Downey Jr.’s “first” Avenger has made less than $300 million at the box office. The last one to gross less than $400 million was Iron Man 2 7 years ago. However, this isn’t an Iron Man movie and it doesn’t have the vast casts of the Avengers or Civil War films, so a lower final tally wouldn’t be surprising.
Oscar Prospects: Uncertain. For a time, any film starring Iron Man was a guaranteed Oscar nominee. However, that has since changed with the last two efforts underwhelming Oscar voters. Thus, it’s possible the film is ignored. However, if there’s any category it could be a factor in, it’s Best Visual Effects.
Cinema Sight Preview: See my preview of this title here.

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Looking at the Weekend: Jun. 23-25, 2017

There’s no competition for Transformers: The Last Knight. Wonder Woman should have a decent fourth weekend, but not enough to take it into the top spot. Cars 3 had a relatively soft opening, which means its second weekend drop, even if small, is going to drop it below Wonder Woman. So, even if Transformers gets bad reviews, which it will, the $100 million opening of the prior film, in spite of bad reviews, won’t dissuade moviegoers to check it out.

Our Highest Rated Films: The Beguiled
Our Best Awards Ratings: The Beguiled (Oscars); Transformers: The Last Knight (Oscars)

OTHER LIMITED RELEASES

Alien Arrival
F(l)ag Football
Food Evolution
The Operative
The Ornithologist
Tubelight

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Review: Wonder Woman (2017)

Wonder Woman

Rating

Director

Patty Jenkins

Screenplay

Allan Heinberg

Length

2h 21m

Starring

Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen, Robin Wright, Danny Huston, David Thewlis, Said Taghmaoui, Ewen Bremner, Eugene Brave Rock, Lucy Davis, Elena Anaya

MPAA Rating

PG-13 for sequences of violence and action, and some suggestive content

Original Preview

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This Day in Oscar History: June 21 (2017)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

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Film Preview: Daddy’s Home 2 (2017)

Page Revisions:

(June 18, 2017) Original

Release Date:

November 10, 2017

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Plot unknown. A follow-up to the 2015 comedy ‘Daddy’s Home.”

Poster Rating: –


Review: There was no poster immediately available for my review. Should one become available in the future, this section will be updated.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: I never really got into the original film, so this trailer doesn’t instill in me any sense of excitement. However, there are a couple of funny moments suggesting at least a publicity department that knows how to sell a follow-up.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Oscar Statistics: Foreign Language Films, Part 2

“A Nous La Liberte” (1931)

Every month, we’re going to be looking at the Oscars in a different way. While most of our content deals with predictions and precursors and reviews and previews and everything in between, the facts and statistics surrounding the Oscars are seldom referenced but in passing. These articles will change that. Every week, we’ll take a narrow look at statistics about and surrounding the Oscars.

When putting together last month’s look at Foreign Language Films at the Oscars, I came across a lot of interesting data that would make for a very long post. As such, I broke it down into two different posts, finishing up with this article.

Finding a place to start with this set of statistics is a daunting task. There are so many angles at which to go at these numbers that starting with a quick comparison is probably best. 300 films have been nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars to date. That’s 5 nominees a year for the last 60 years (2016 was the 60th anniversary of the category). This number does not include the eight films that won Oscars prior to the category’s existence, but it does include the only film ever disqualified for this category: A Place in the World. Uruguay submitted the film for the 1992 Academy Awards, but it was later revealed that artistic control was predominantly held by Argentina and thus the film was ruled ineligible.

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The DVD Report #521

Frantz, the new film from Francois Ozon, the noted French director of Under the Sand, 8 Women, and Swimming Pool, is a remake of Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 classic Broken Lullaby, which was the film version of Maurice Rostand’s post-World War I play The Man I Killed.

As with the previous version, Frantz is about a sensitive French soldier who comes to Germany to visit the parents and fiancée of a German soldier killed in the war. In Broken Lullaby we know from the outset why he is there, but in Frantz we are kept guessing until the big reveal halfway through. At that point, Broken Lullaby moved quickly to its happy ending whereas Frantz has another hour to go in which layer upon layer of other secrets and lies are revealed.

For Maurice Rostand, whose father Edmond Rostand wrote Cyrano de Bergerac, The Man I Killed was his greatest success. For Ernst Lubitsch, his Broken Lullaby was a major flop for the nonpareil director of sophisticated comedies like Trouble in Paradise and musicals like The Smiling Lieutenant. Despite generally rapturous reviews, audiences wouldn’t accept the director’s one attempt at seriousness and brokenhearted Lubitsch vowed never to make another dramatic film. He kept his word, going on to make only such idyllic comedies as Ninotchka and The Shop Around the Corner. For Ozon, Frantz is a departure as well. It’s his first film not heavily steeped in sex.

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This Day in Oscar History: June 20 (2017)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: Now That You’ve Seen “Cars 3”

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Now That You’ve Seen Cars 3…?

Cinema Sight Asks: Now that you've seen "Cars 3," which "Cars" franchise movie is best?

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Trailer Watch: Detroit (2017) Updated

New Trailer (#2)

Detroit, updated

Preview Link: CLICK HERE for all of the new content as well as the original.

Oscar Preview: Weekend of Jun. 16-17, 2017

We had two films release this past weekend with the potential for Oscar nominations.

Cars 3

Returning to the world of Cars, 11 years after narrowly losing Best Animated Feature to the now-largely-forgotten Happy Feet, Pixar is hoping to return to the Oscar race with only the second film they’ve made more than one sequel to. The other, Toy Story 3 was an industry darling, handily winning the Best Animated Feature Award, possibly because the first two films came out before the category existed.

The problem is that in 2011, Cars 2 set a precedent that Pixar hasn’t been able to escape since. After that picture, no sequel or prequel to a Pixar feature has scored an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Feature. Not Cars 2, not Monsters University, not Finding Dory. That kind of history is hard to ignore and may hinder Cars 3‘s chances.

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The Morning After: Jun. 19, 2017

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

Cars 3


What made the original Cars such a charmer was its desire to not only dig into Americana in a way that animated films don’t seem capable of doing, it also explored the ideas of drive, experience, selflessness, and more. When Cars 2 took the series in a whole different direction, embracing a crass, commercialized espionage thriller veneer, with an excessive amount of Mater, everything fell apart. The wholesomeness and familial energy evaporated.

With Cars 3, we return to the style and direction of the original film, a refreshing step back to what made the series work in the first place. Although the film does have a lot of similar threads to the original film, they work themselves out in unique and interesting directions. The voice cast fades in places, but strikes out wonderfully in others. Nathan Fillion does a fine job as the new head of Rusteze while the ever-annoying Larry the Cable Guy continues to disappoint (and really deserves to be junked at this point). Owen Wilson is uneven as Lightning McQueen and Cristela Alonzo is given little material into which she can sink her teeth.

This time out, the visuals are spectacular. In the 11 years since the original hit the big screen, the technology has improved and so too have the visuals in this film. Still popping with color, the rich details are impressive, most notably the natural environments through which McQueen and company traverse. If it suffers, it’s because the plot is so familiar and predictable. Pixar trends often in that direction, but here things lack that typical Pixar spark that push the movie beyond the commonplace animated feature. A fitting follow-up to the original and a superb step up from the second film, Cars 3 suggests there’s still life left in the ailing series, though a fourth film needs to take things in a similar, but less formulaic direction.

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