Poll: Best of the Animated Feature (2001 – 2005)

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Best Animated Feature Poll: 2001 – 2005

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Best Animated Feature winner is best?

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Film Preview: The Confirmation (2016)

Page Revisions:

(April 24, 2016) Original

Release Date:

March 18, 2016

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Eight year old Anthony is somewhat uneasy about spending the weekend with his alcoholic, down-on-his-luck carpenter dad Walt while his mom Bonnie and her new husband Kyle go to a Catholic retreat together. Walt is just as uneasy about spending time with Anthony, especially since their first day together is a series of characteristically unfortunate events, including his truck breaking down, his landlord locking him out of the house, and the theft of his toolbox, which he needs for an upcoming job. As Walt and Anthony set about finding the guy who stole the tools and improvise around their other misfortunes, they begin to discover a true connection with each other, causing Walt to become a better father and Anthony to reveal the promise and potential of the good man he will become.”

Poster Rating: –


Review: There was no poster immediately available for my review. Should one become available in the future, this section will be updated.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: There’s something about the premise that gives one hope as presented in the trailer, but the film doesn’t look well constructed based on the content.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Oscar Profile #285: Hal Ashby

AshbyBorn September 2, 1929 in Ogden, Utah, (William) Hal Ashby was the fourth and youngest child in a Mormon family. He had a rough childhood that saw the divorce of his parents when he was 6, his father’s suicide when he was 12 and two marriages and divorces of his own before the age of 21.

Moving to California, Ashby found a job as a printing press operator at Universal where he befriended a pre-stardom young messenger named Jack Nicholson. By 1956 he had become an assistant editor, working on such films as Friendly Persuasion, The Big Country, The Diary of Anne Frank, The Children’s Hour, The Best Man and The Greatest Story Ever Told. He became the chief editor for the first time on 1965’s The Loved One, after which he worked exclusively on five films for Norman Jewison, The Cincinnati Kid, The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming (his first Oscar nomination), In the Heat of the Night (his Oscar win), The Thomas Crown Affair and Gaily, Gaily.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 28 (2016)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died


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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Apr. 29-May 1, 2016)

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What Are You Watching? (Apr. 29-May 1, 2016)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 29-May 1, 2016)

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Film Preview: The Founder (2016)

Page Revisions:

(April 24, 2016) Original

Release Date:

August 5, 2016

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “The story of McDonald’s founder, Ray Kroc.”

Poster Rating: C+

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Review: It’s a nice tease, but it’s a rudimentary one.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: At first, the trailer is played like Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton) is a visionary and compelling leader, but it ends painting him as a megalomaniac. I’m not sure how you sell a film with that unlikable a protagonist.

Oscar Prospects:

It could be an Oscar player if it weren’t an August release. The film seems to have lost a lot of its buzz since Michael Keaton was cast.

Trailer #1

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Looking at the Weekend: Apr. 29-May 1, 2016

Can The Jungle Book take another round at the top? It’s likely with this uninspiring batch of new openers. The only reason I give Ratchet & Clank the top chance of the new releases to come in high on the list is that there haven’t been a lot of animated films lately, which means there may be interest from families. Mother’s Day might bring women to the box office, but its simple antiquated concept isn’t likely a big draw. Keanu may appeal to fans of Key & Peele and those looking for a corny comedy, but I can’t see that be a big draw.

Our Highest Rated Films: Viva, The Family Fang
Our Best Awards Ratings: The Family Fang (Oscars), The Man Who Knew Infinity (Globes & Oscars)

OTHER LIMITED RELEASES

A Beautiful Planet
Eva Hesse

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2016 Blockbuster Season Preview: May

Here we look at the upcoming month’s offerings.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 27 (2016)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died


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Film Preview: Jason Bourne (2016)

Page Revisions:

(April 24, 2016) Original

Release Date:

July 29, 2016

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Jason Bourne, now remembering who he truly is, tries to uncover hidden truths about his past.”

Poster Rating: D / D+

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Review: (#1 & #2) You may know his name, but that doesn’t make these posters interesting in the least. Of course, I don’t think anyone’s interested in selling these as art pieces. The second is only a slight improvement.

Trailer Rating: B

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Review: If you’re a fan of the franchise and have watched the events of the Matt Damon-starring editions, then there’s something of a rooting interest in this trailer.

Oscar Prospects:

Seldom does this franchise receive Oscar nominations, so I wouldn’t put too much faith in it getting nominated.

Trailer #1

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The DVD Report #481

The Revenant posterOne of the most highly anticipated films of 2015, Alfonso G. Annaritu’s The Revenant, lived up to the advance hype, winning numerous awards including three Oscars out of twelve nominations. For cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, it was his third consecutive win behind Gravity and Birdman, a first in his category. For Inarritu, it was his second win in two years, following the previous year’s Birdman. In doing so he tied a record reached just twice before by John Ford (The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley) and Joseph L. Mankiewicz (A Letter to Three Wives, All About Eve). Like both Ford and Mankiewicz, only one of the two films for which he won Best Director would win Best Picture as well. Birdman won over Boyhood but The Revenant lost to Spotlight.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s win for Best Actor was his first out of five acting nominations in twenty-two years. He has a sixth nomination for producing Best Picture nominee The Wolf of Wall Street. While many have scoffed at his Oscar campaign in which he talked about the hardships he endured in making the film, it should be noted that although suffering for one’s art is in itself not a prerequisite for winning an Oscar, making your character look like he has suffered beyond endurance does count. For those who complained about his relative lack of dialogue in the film, it should be noted that spouting reams of dialogue is not a prerequisite for winning an Oscar either. Jane Wyman (Johnny Belinda) and John Mills (Ryan’s Daughter) won for keeping their mouths shut and Patty Duke (The Miracle Worker) won for speaking just one word.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 26 (2016)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born


Died



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Poll: Now That You’ve Seen “The Huntsman: Winter’s War”

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Now That You’ve Seen The Huntsman: Winter’s War…?

Cinema Sight Asks: Now that you've seen "The Huntsman: Winter's War," which prequel of the last 10 years is best?

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Film Preview: The Girl on the Train (2016)

Page Revisions:

(April 24, 2016) Original

Release Date:

October 7, 2016

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “The Girl on the Train is the story of Rachel Watson’s life post-divorce. Every day, she takes the train in to work in New York, and every day the train passes by her old house. The house she lived in with her husband, who still lives there, with his new wife and child. As she attempts to not focus on her pain, she starts watching a couple a few houses down — Megan and Scott Hipwell. She creates a wonderful dream life for them in her head, about how they are a perfect happy family. And then one day, as the train passes, she sees something shocking, filling her with rage. The next day, she wakes up with a horrible hangover, various wounds and bruises, and no memory of the night before. She has only a feeling: something bad happened. Then come the TV reports: Megan Hipwell is missing. Rachel becomes invested in the case and trying to find out what happened to Megan, where she is, and what exactly she herself was up to that same night Megan went missing.”

Poster Rating: C-

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Review: Does this really say anything about the film? No. Unless maybe you’ve read the book. It’s a poor advertising tool and suggests something that isn’t evident in the trailer.

Trailer Rating: B

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Review: If it weren’t for Emily Blunt, this trailer might not look that interesting. There are some compelling situations displayed in the trailer, which could make it worth checking out.

Oscar Prospects:

The book was a sensation and it could follow Gone Girl‘s path to the Oscars, but beyond Emily Blunt for Best Actress, I can’t see the film hitting much of an Oscar stride.

Trailer #1

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The Morning After: Apr. 25, 2016

Welcome to The Morning After, where I share with you what movies I’ve seen over the past week. Below, you will find short reviews of those movies along with a star rating. Full length reviews may come at a later date.

So, here is what I watched this past week:

And Then There Were NoneAndThenThereWereNone


There have been four big screen adaptation of Agatha Christie’s legendary And Then There Were None, but it’s taken the BBC to finally turn a two-part miniseries into the best version to date.

Anyone who’s read the book and the stage adaptation knows that the two have entirely different endings. The book doesn’t hold any pretense about being dark and fascinating, one of the most surprising and compelling finales in literature. While all prior adaptations have focused on the happier ending of the stage play, this miniseries sticks to the book’s conclusion. The story, about ten men and women who are invited to an island off the coast of England to be confronted by a killer who wants to murder ten people whose crimes were never adequately prosecuted, the guests are slaughtered one by one as prescribed by a children’s nursery rhyme about ten little soldier boys.

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