Film Preview: The Souvenir (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

May 17, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A young film student in the early 80s becomes romantically involved with a complicated and untrustworthy man.”

Poster Rating: C

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Review: There isn’t much here. The use of reflections is interesting, but it doesn’t play into the plot as well as it probably should and it certainly doesn’t make the film look appealing.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: This indie drama wants to feel important and it wants the audience to know it’s important, but the end result is that no one thinks it’s important, just pompous.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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This Day in Oscar History: April 20 (2019)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Our Site Milestones

Born

Died

Released

Our Site Milestones

2010: This Day in Oscar History (9)

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Film Preview: Charlie Says (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

May 17, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Three young women were sentenced to death in the infamous Manson murder case, but when the death penalty was lifted, their sentence became life imprisonment. One young graduate student was sent in to teach them – and through her we witness their transformations as they face the reality of their horrific crimes.”

Poster Rating: B- / C (2) / C- / D

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Review: (#1) The semi-psychedelic design fits the period well, though the colors don’t work well together and the construction is clunky. (#2-#3) This pair of posters is nearly identical and that’s the problem. Both of them employ a heavy amount of red with the second being less heavily awash int he color. (#4) Is this a potential scene from “Cell Block Tango” from Chicago, or something altogether different. The blocky nature and cheap looking embellishments are all poorly combined. (#5) Taking the blocky design of the previous poster and combining them poorly into this even less impressive fifth design simply does not work.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: Some of the charm of Charles Manson comes through in the trailer, but the film is focused more on rehabilitating the women he brainwashed. While that’s not an ignoble goal, the trailer doesn’t make a case for it being a riveting or important version.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Film Preview: The Addams Family (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

October 11, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “An animated version of Charles Addams’ series of cartoons about a peculiar, ghoulish family.”

Poster Rating: B

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Review: Not very creepy. A little bit kooky. Not altogether ooky. Though, it is the Addams Family as originally envisioned by Charles Addams rather than either previous incarnation.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: We’ll all be attempting to evoke the original Addams Family TV theme in our reviews, but the trailer doesn’t quite encapsulate those versus, which makes the first trailer a bit disappointing.

Oscar Prospects:

An Animated Feature nomination is possible. A win is unlikely.

Trailer #1

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Film Preview: Aniara (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

May 17, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A spaceship carrying settlers to Mars is knocked off course, causing the consumption-obsessed passengers to consider their place in the universe.”

Poster Rating: B-

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Review: This poster design is reminiscent of the one for Moon, but the symbolism here, if there is any, gets a bit lost.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: It wants to be a serious-minded sci-fi spectacle, but the trailer never gives the audience a genuine understanding of why it’s significant or important.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Oscar in Box Office History (Week 16, 2019)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals at the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office each weekend historically. All data is collected from Box Office Mojo. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best shots at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

None

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The Friday Face-Off #0

This week, we lay out the guidelines for the upcoming several weeks of polls to face-off one Oscar winner against another.

Taking the first ninety years of Oscar (the 2018 Oscars will not be included), we will pit winners against one another across a series of rounds. Before we begin those rounds, an explanation of them would be appropriate.

Round Zero: Data Collection – This initial round will be done prior to the start of Round One next week. Taking the current 24 categories, we start by eliminating documentary and short film categories. The remaining twenty categories are then pulled together with every winner the category has generated. Some categories have more winners (Original Screenplay) than others (Animated Feature). Behind the scenes, I will collect all of the winners and determine how many films will fit into each bracket for each category. For example, Best Picture has had a total of 91 winners (if you count Unique and Artist Production, which will count for this particular designation). 64 films will compete leaving 27 to be eliminated. Then there’s animated feature, which has had only 17 winners. We only need to eliminate 1 to get down to a manageable bracket of 16. 16, 32, 64, and 128 will be the bracket sizes. Most of the categories appear to shrink to 64, though there is at least one category with each bracket size.

Round One: Eliminations – Once all of this is done, we will begin a weekly elimination round. each category will be broken down across each of Oscar’s nine decades. Voters will then be able to select seven of the ten winners in most categories to preserve for the competition. Some categories, such as Original Screenplay and Original Score will have significantly more winners in a decade, so these will take a bit longer to narrow and will feature several sets of ten. In cases where it’s not possible to divide the number of winners in all categories evenly by ten, there will be a few polls of 11 or 12 titles. In the case of 11, you will still select 7. In the case of 12, you will select 8. In some cases, there may be fewer than ten selections. Whenever that is the case, the number of selections will be as close to 70% as possible. Once all of these polls have been completed, the lowest vote-getters in each category will be eliminated. The number to remove will be determined during Round Zero. Should there be ties for the final spots, a final round of tie-breaking will be conducted to choose them.

Round Two: Winners Bracket – Across the span of several weeks, we will conduct individual face-offs placing films into the brackets in the date of awarding such that 1934 will compete against 1935 and so forth. The winners is the film with the most votes. Ties will be broken in favor of the higher vote tally from Round One. Should the tie persist, both winners will be submitted to a round of comparative voting where each will be ranked on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being highest.

Round Three: Losers Bracket – Getting eliminated in Round Two will not be the end of the road for a film. The losers of Round Two will be put into their own bracket to compete similarly for reprieve. Once a winner has been eliminated twice, they are out of the competition for good.

We will go back and forth between Round Two and Round Three until winners of both the Winners Bracket and Losers Bracket have been determined. Going back and forth allows extra time for voting for later selections.

Once this is all completed, we will have a definitive list of winners. Each week, we will post around ten polls, each of different categories in order to ensure that all categories get equal air time.

Those are the rules. We will see you all in one week with our first batch of Round One polls.

This Day in Oscar History: April 19 (2019)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

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Poll: Remaking Best Supporting Actor, 2000

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Polls

Remaking Best Supporting Actor, 2000

In our third pass of the Oscar nominees from 1997 through 2016, we take a look at the nominees for Best Supporting Actor. Each week, we’ll present a list of contenders from which you can select five to make up the Best Supporting Actor slate. There will be an “Other” option, but you can only use this once and you’ll have to specify your other in the comments. Now on to the game: Best Supporting Actor.

Cinema Sight Asks: Which Hopefuls Should Have Been Nominated for Best Supporting Actor (select up to 5)?

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Film Preview: Domino (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

May 31, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A Copenhagen police officer seeks justice for his partner’s murder by a mysterious man.”

Poster Rating: C

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Review: If you’re selling your film solely based on the appearance of an actor from Game of Thrones, making them look dead-eyed isn’t going to improve the chunky style of the poster design.

Trailer Rating: C+

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Review: A slow burn trailer might convey to the viewer that the film will be similar in pace, but that might not be enough to push it over the top.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Film Preview: The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

June 14, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A young man searches for home in the changing city that seems to have left him behind.”

Poster Rating: C

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Review: A title that doesn’t make sense against an admitted beautiful, but ineffective backdrop don’t make for much of a sales tool, even with the critics plaudits on the front.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: There’s a metaphor going on with the title, but it’s not well conveyed with this trailer, which tells the audience that there’s emotional drama at the core, but never convinces them of it.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Trailer #1

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Film Preview: The Tomorrow Man (2019)

Page Revisions:

(April 14, 2019) Original

Release Date:

May 22, 2019

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Ed Hemsler spends his life preparing for a disaster that may never come. Ronnie Meisner spends her life shopping for things she may never use. In a small town somewhere in America, these two people will try to find love while trying not to get lost in each other’s stuff.”

Poster Rating: C / C

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Review: (#1) A dully colored design that picks up the color of the truck and attempts to use it as a visual theme, which doesn’t fit at all. (#2) Then we have a truck that changes colors because it doesn’t match the richer, warmer palette being used here. Neither has an advantage because both are rather dull images.

Trailer Rating: B-

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Review: Blythe Danner looks engaging, but the rest of the film never quite conveys to the viewer why its important, necessary, or why they should want to give it a shot.

Oscar Prospects:

Blythe Danner has never had a chance at an Oscar nomination, but with the right positioning, this could be the film.

Trailer #1

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Oscar Profile #440: William A. Fraker

Born September 29, 1923 in Los Angeles, California, William A. Fraker III was the son of William A. Fraker, Jr., Department Head of Still Photography at Columbia, and his Mexican born wife who fled Mazatlan, Mexico with her mother and sister on a mule during Mexico’s revolution in 1910. Both parents died of influenza in 1934. He was raised by his fearless Mexican grandmother, then a photographer for Monroe Studios in downtown Los Angeles. She instructed him in the art of photography as she had his father.

Fraker served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and attended USC under the G.I. Bill, graduating with a degree in Cinema. He was admitted into the camera union in 1954 and worked extensively in TV from 1956-1964, predominantly on the series, The Lone Ranger, The Outer Limits and The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. During this period, he worked as cinematographer for the Hawaiian sequences of 1958’s The Old Man and the Sea.

He married wife Denise, born in 1941, in 1959. Their son, William A. Fraker IV aka William A. Fraker, Jr., was born in 1960.

After uncredited work behind the camera on 1965’s Morituri and 1966’s The Professionals, Fraker entered the big time with six back-to-back major credits as cinematographer on 1967’s Games, The Fox and The President’s Analyst, 1968’s Rosemary’s Baby and Bullitt, and 1969’s Paint Your Wagon.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 18 (2019)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Released

Oscar Ceremonies

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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Apr. 19-21, 2019)

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Polls

What Are You Watching? (Apr. 19-21, 2019)

Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 19-21, 2019)

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