Film Preview: Private Number (2015)

Poster


Trailer Link

Release Date:

May 1, 2015

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A series of cryptic phone messages and visions haunt a writer while he struggles to finish a novel. As they increase in intensity, he loses his grip on reality, eventually obsessing over an old mystery that will lead to horrific revelations about both him and his loyal wife.”

Poster: C

Review: While it’s a bit of a head trip, it only loosely ties into the film its trying to sell.

Trailer: C-

Review: A formulaic, predictable thriller about a man terrorized by a ghost of his past. It’s been done so often that the images cobbled together for this trailer almost blend together.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Revisions:

(April 12, 2015) Original

Oscar in Box Office History (Week 16, 2015)

Every week, we’ll take a look back in 5-year intervals in the box office past to explore how Oscar’s nominees were doing at the box office that weekend historically. All data is collected from Box Office Mojo. The first section under each year is the positioning of all Oscar nominees during that weekend at the box office (as well as a section looking at the inflation-adjusted numbers). The third section is an alphabetical list of those films and the categories in which they were nominated. And to start each week off, we’ll be looking at the films releasing over the weekend that have the best chance of getting Oscar nominations and specifying the categories where we think they have the best chance at this stage of the game. If you have any suggestions for more data you’d like to see, please let us know.

This Year: Potential Oscar Nominees Releasing This Weekend

None

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The NEW Friday Face-Off #89

We started over at the beginning of August 2013, but with a new, more streamlined methodology to collecting votes. Just choose one selection in each of the ten categories (or fewer depending on the week) below. Our first few weeks were to select winners in cases of ties or in years where multiple categories existed for each discipline. After that, we started going into the full face-off contest where each winner will then move on to a second round to face off against others.

Here is this week’s ten (or fewer) face-offs. So, let’s get started.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 17 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born


Died

Ceremonies


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Poll: Best Film Editing (1974 – 1978)

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Polls

Best Film Editing Poll: 1974 – 1978

<a href="http://www.sodahead.com/entertainment/cinema-sight-asks-which-best-film-editing-winner-is-best/question-4786920/" title="Cinema Sight Asks: Which Best Film Editing winner is best?">Cinema Sight Asks: Which Best Film Editing winner is best?</a>

Film Preview: Blackbird (2015)

Poster



Trailer Link

Release Date:

April 26, 2015

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “A young singer struggles with his sexuality and the treatment of others while coming of age in a small Southern Baptist community.”

Poster: B+ / C+

Review: (#1) The stained glass approach isn’t a very common one, which makes the use here fascinating. It may not speak much to the film’s themes, but it is fitting within the general framework. (#2) While I admire the attempt to go a new route with color usage, the design is a bit too detail-light to be interesting.

Trailer: C

Review: This generic trailer construction sets out the film’s premise, but doesn’t do a very good job of making the story seem important or crucial.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Revisions:

(April 12, 2015) Original

Oscar Profile #232: John Mills

John MillsBorn February 22, 1908 in Norfolk, England, the son of a mathematics teacher and a theatre box-office cashier, Lewis Ernest Watts Mills is bettered remembered as the distinguished Oscar winning actor, John Mills.

Interested in acting from an early age, Mills made his professional acting debut in Five O’Clock Girl at the London Hippodrome in 1929 two years after his marriage to actress Aileen Raymond. He made his film debut in Midshipman Gob in 1932, but did not make much of an impression until he played one of Robert Donat’s former students as a young man in 1939’s Goodbye, Mr. Chips. Divorced from Raymond in 1941, he married dramatist Mary Hayley Bell in 1941 with whom he had three children, actresses Juliet and Hayley and son Jonathan Mills.

A standout in 1942’s In Which We Serve co-directed by Noel Coward and David Lean and 1944’s This Happy Breed written by Coward and directed by Lean, Mills achieved major stardom as Pip in Lean’s 1946 film of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations. Other important late 1940s films included So Well Remembered and The Rocking Horse Winner.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 16 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born


Died

Released

Our Site Milestones

2010: Film Fun Friday (1)

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Poll: What Are You Watching? (Apr. 17-19, 2015)

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Polls

What Are You Watching? (Apr. 17-19, 2015)

<a href="http://www.sodahead.com/entertainment/cinema-sight-asks-what-are-you-watching-apr-17-19-2015/question-4785684/" title="Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 17-19, 2015)">Cinema Sight Asks: What are you watching? (Apr. 17-19, 2015)</a>

Film Preview: Loitering with Intent (2015)

Poster


Trailer Link

Release Date:

January 16, 2015

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “Two male actors/close friends want to jumpstart their careers. They end up making a big shot producer think that they have a hot script that everyone wants to get their hands on. The 2 men then drive to upstate New York and hole up in a family member’s country home- with 10 dedicated days to write said script. Dominic and Raphael then get derailed by a beautiful gardener, Ava and Dominic’s sister, Gigi. Both women appear at the house, which was supposed to be serene enough to focus on the task at hand. But to add to the problems, Gigi’s boyfriend Wayne arrives, still suffering from PTSD, and his brother Devon as well, creating even more havoc. A looming deadline and complicated personal histories create scenes that are humorous and emotional.”

Poster: B

Review: This design has an almost otherworldly charm to it, feeling much like a design that might have accompanied a drama set in the Antebellum South. It’s an interesting concept even if it’s otherwise unimpressive.

Trailer: B-

Review: The trailer is all over the place in terms of tone, shifting from drama to comedy and back again without feeling natural. The story seems very cluttered and difficult to follow, though there are enough interesting elements to make it a passable DVD offering.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Revisions:

(April 12, 2015) Original

Looking at the Weekend: Apr. 17-19, 2015

Another week at the top for Furious 7 is likely, but Paul Blart may be a tough comeptitor.

Individual Commentaries

Wesley Lovell: Unfriended might be interesting, but Child 44 is probably the better option.
Peter J. Patrick: Some of this week’s new films seem moderately interesting, but nothing really screams “must-see”.
Tripp Burton: Lots of genre fare this week, so pick what suits your fancy!
Thomas LaTourrette: Monkey Kingdom and Child 44 sound like very diverse winners and could be worth seeing. The other two don’t excite me much.

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2015 Tentpole Season Preview: Introduction

This Summer promises to be explosive with more sequels, remakes and reboots than you could possibly shake a stick at. Some of the most popular franchises in history have a new movie coming out, which should make for huge box office hits.

To introduce you to the upcoming films, there will be two preview articles every month and this introduction every four months. The Season Preview article will focus on one of three seasons Spring Season (January through April), Tentpole Season (May through August) and Oscar Season (September through December). In these introductory articles, I will give you the current release schedule for the specified season, which may change as the release dates get closer.

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This Day in Oscar History: April 15 (2015)

Here’s what happened today in Oscar History.

Born

Died

Ceremonies


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Film Preview: No Escape (2015)

Poster


Trailer Link

Release Date:

September 2, 2015

Synopsis:

From IMDb: “In their new overseas home, an American family soon finds themselves caught in the middle of a coup, and they frantically look for a safe escape in an environment where foreigners are being immediately executed.”

Poster: C-

Review: Action heavy, but devoid of excitement or creativity. This is the kind of design you expect for a film that will bypass theaters entirely and go direct to video on demand.

Trailer: B

Review: The editors do a good job of conveying the dire stakes at play here, setting this up as a daring escape film as crises and danger surround our hero and his family.

Oscar Prospects:

None.

Revisions:

(April 12, 2015) Original

The DVD Report #408

A Most Violent Year started out the 2014 awards season with promise, winning National Board of Review awards for Best Picture, Actor Oscar Isaac (tied with Birdman’s Michael Keaton) and Best Supporting Actress Jessica Chastain. Aside from a few critics’ nominations for Chastain, however, that was it for J.C. Chandor’s third film.

Word of mouth was not kind to the film which initially drew audiences anticipating a slam-bang action film, which it is not. Its title refers to 1981, the year in which it takes place, deemed to be the most violent in New York City history. Isaac plays a heating oil business owner trying to expand that business, but running into trouble when his oil trucks are hijacked and his oil stolen and sold on the black market. Chastain is his bookkeeper wife, the daughter of a mafia kingpin serving time in federal prison. Violence does occur but it is not the main focus of the film which like Chandor’s previous films, Margin Call and All Is Lost, is concerned with character development as much as it is with plot.

Isaac and Chastain, who have known each other since Julliard, are wonderful together. There are fine supporting performances, too, from David Oyelowo as the federal prosecutor investigating Isaac’s company, Albert Brooks as Isaac’s wily lawyer, and Elyes Gabel as a very unlucky truck driver. The film, which is handsomely photographed on location in NYC, is available on both Blu-ray and standard DVD.

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